Saturday, April 07, 2007

Tradition

My Great-Grandparents came to Canada from the Ukraine, met and had many children, one of them my favourite grandmother. I admit it, she's my absolute favourite! I feel closest and most like her and think she's hilarious, though she doesn't know she's being funny. Like the way she never says goodbye when you talk to her on the phone. It's just an "ok" and *click*.

Holiday dinners at grandma's always had cabbage rolls (holubtsi) and perogi (pyrohy). Cooking and craft sort of skipped a generation in my family and I've started to take over the role official Cabbage Roll Maker and Knitter (she taught me when I was wee).

So this is about my fourth go at making cabbage rolls and it's getting easier. I give myself a day or two and do it in steps. If I did it all in one run I'd be worn out at the end. I also try not to snack on them as I make them so I'm not sick of eating them come Easter dinner. They're very simple in construction but take a lot of work and the house stinks like a giant cabbage at the end, but boy is it worth it!

The ingredients.
- cabbage
- rice
- bacon
- onion
- tomato soup

Step 1: Put a whole cabbage in a pot and boil, peeling leaves off, one by one.

Step 2: Make rice. Dice bacon and onions. Fry till soft. Stir into rice and add 1/2 can tomato soup.



Step 3: Take cabbage leaves, slice out hard core. Place a tablespoon of rice mixture in and roll. This is the hardest part because cabbage leaves don't always cooperate.










Step 4: Place in roasting pan, lined with tinfoil for easy clean up, pour the rest of the can of tomato soup (diluted with water) and bake.

Step 5: Eat!

Important Note:
Sour cream must be served with cabbage rolls.





I just called Grandma to see if I should bake them tonight or tomorrow morning (she says tomorrow).

She didn't say goodbye. haha!

5 comments:

LadyLungDoc said...

You have sour cream with your holobsti? Wow, my family never does that - the sour cream is for pyrohy. The only only accompaniment to holobsti we have is mushroom gravy, and that's only for buckwheat holobsti (probably because they tend to be pretty dry); rice ones are eaten unadorned. BTW - I've always wondered where people in the Ukraine got rice from in olden days.

Kelly said...

Well, I don't know my culinary history all that well, but I think rice came to Europe 400-500 years ago. I'm sure there's many varieties of cabbages rolls and maybe they started out as something different, but I think the point of them is that they're cheap and easy to make. Rice is cheap and easy to grow and when you come to North America it's a logical ingredient. Anyway, this is the way our family does it! We have sour cream with both cabbage rolls and perogi.

koko puff said...

Sour cream is a must! I sure hope there are leftovers on Tuesday :)

Jason said...

NIce recepie!

Did you see that you got Regular Reader of the Day on Humble Howard's site?

Ha Ha! I nominated you!

Jason said...

that looks so yummy and that it would take a lot of time and patience!